Righteousness

Conundrum?

I hate sin, but I love it when God shatters my idol of self righteousness…

For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am of the flesh, sold under sin. For I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. Now if I do what I do not want, I agree with the law, that it is good. So now it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells within me. For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is in my flesh. For I have the desire to do what is right, but not the ability to carry it out. For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I keep on doing. -Romans 7:14-19

For, being ignorant of the righteousness of God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God’s righteousness. For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.-Romans 10:3-4

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Just thinking…

A friend of mine was talking today about one of his biggest issues in his Christian walk is that he still sometimes loves sin more than he does Jesus. I completely understand what he’s saying, and can most certainly identify with him. I think I would word it in a different way though. It probably means basically the same thing, but I think to really deal with the root issue we have to say that sometimes, no, most times…we love ourselves more than we love Jesus. I think sin is really nothing more than us putting ourselves, and our desires, above those of God’s. I think when we word it the way my friend did, we almost…in some sense…are placing the blame on something outside of ourselves. But sin in itself isn’t the problem. The problem is our choosing to sin. The action is an expression of the state of our hearts. The answer doesn’t lie in trying to not sin…but in trying to love God. If we don’t love Him more than we love ourselves…piety doesn’t matter. You could live the most “righteous” life in the history of man…but if your heart isn’t in the right place. Does it really matter?

John the Baptist made a great and very wise statement when he said that he must decrease so that Jesus could increase. I believe he was referring mainly to how he was viewed in the eyes of the people. For us we need to take this statement in how we view ourselves in our own minds. There is a great line in a popular Christian song that I hear quite often, it says, “rid me of myself” and “lead me to the cross”. I believe this ought to be our prayer.

Just thinking….